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1. 2005 ATKINS SKIFF

Designed in 1924 by William Atkin. In the designer's words, "A boat of this kind offers a lot in the way of recreation; for the cruiser-camper it is ideal, being shallow and light, and thus easily drawn up on the beach or river bank anywhere. There is plenty of room for the stowage of dunnage which must be lugged along when camping."  LOA 12'  Beam 3’9”

Before the EECBS had a building to work in year round, they build boats outside in the summertime. The Bennett Skiff was built in the yard behind the Marine Museum in 2004. The Atkins skiff was built in the yard behind Ray Hartjen house on Old Fireplace Road in 2005. See a YouTube video of the constrution:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7Df39Zf32Y


2. 2009 SWAMPSCOTT DORY

Designed in 1924 by William Atkin.

In the designer's words, "A boat of this kind offers a lot in the way of recreation; for the cruiser-camper it is ideal, being shallow and light, and thus easily drawn up on the beach or river bank anywhere. There is plenty of room for the stowage of dunnage which must be lugged along when camping."  LOA 12’6”  Beam 4’4”


3. 2010 CATSPAW DINGHY

The Catspaw Dinghy is Joel White’s 12’8” version of the famed Herreshoff Dinghy Columbia. Catspaw is a carvel planked with 1/2” cedar over steam-bent oak frames, and copper rivet fastened. An open boat that rows with ease and swiftness.   LOA 12’6” Beam 4’6”


4. 2011 SUNSHINE TENDER

Sunshine seems to be everyone's all-time favorite. The original boat was built about 1915, and there is no way to improve on her. She is what yacht tenders are supposed to be-you can dump nearly any load into her and she'll still row easily and will track at the end of the painter without yawing or running down on the towing vessel in a following sea.  LOA 10’6” Beam 4’1”


5. 2012 SWAMPSCOTT DORY

The Swampscott dory is a melding of the earlier Wherry design and new construction techniques used in the mass production of the Banks dory. Swampscott dories were built with rounded sides and slightly less overhang in the bow and stern than a banks dory. This created a more shapely boat that handled better than a bank dory. They were raced along the coast of Massachusetts during the early part of the 20th century. The sail rig was typically a Leg of Mutton and small jib on an unstayed mast.  LOA 12’6”  Beam 4’4”

 


6. 2013 GOELLER DINGHY

The Goeller Dinghy is a responsive boat in a good breeze and should be easy for children to sail, Mr. Goeller proved his design ability when he came up with this boat that will row, sail, and handle an outboard motor, pus be strong, beautiful, and practical at the same time.

LOA 12' Beam 4' 3"


7. 2014 East End Sharpie

Typical of skiffs all over southern New England and Long Island Sound, this model was used through the last four decades of the 19th century. This is an excellent small craft – a fine example of a boat easy and efficient to row, a good performer under sail, and reliable in all weather. The sail is powerful and large for the hull’s size and weight, and the centerboard, skeg and rudder provide a large and balanced lateral plane.  LOA 14’1”  Beam 4’3"


8. 2015 & 2016 POODUCK SKIFF

This dinghy could be considered a big little boat. She has a lot of excellent qualities: excellent rowing and sailing ability, easy construction, and mannerly towing habits.” This is Joel Whites expansion of his well known Shellback Dinghy.

LOA 12’ 10”,  Beam 4’ 6”


9. Sunshine Tender

The Sunshine Tender seems to be everyone's all-time favorite. The original boat was built about 1915, and there is no way to improve on her. She is what yacht tenders are supposed to be-you can dump nearly any load into her and she'll still row easily and will track at the end of the painter without yawing or running down on the towing vessel in a following sea.  Comes complete with sails, oars and galvanized trailer. 

LOA 10’6” Beam 4’1”